The BeanCast Marketing Podcast

Do you follow podcasts? I have a couple management podcasts on my iPod that I’ll listen to during a work out.  I have a new one that I am excited to add. I recently came across The BeanCast marketing podcast and listened to my first show tonight! I am very impressed. I also had the opportunity to meet Mr. Bob Knorpp over the weekend and wish we would have had more time to talk marketing!

 

from thebeancast.us

 

The BeanCast is a round table discussion between Bob Knorpp and various people that are in the marketing and advertising industry.

In the most recent podcast from 1/31/11, Bob talks to Scott Monty and I wanted to share this information because my professor from Promotional Communications last term talked a lot about Mr. Monty. I think anyone that is a marketing student or in the industry should add The BeanCast to their podcast subscriptions.

A great part of the podcast is towards the end, when Bob asks each guest what stories they’re watching in the industry. This is great, and a great way to find new things happening in the industry.

Bob, keep up the great work on The BeanCast!

 

 

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Impressed.

I recently came across an article in Ad Age online regarding the Minneapolis-based program, The Brand Lab. {article here}

Background on The Brand Lab

Our Mission: To create opportunity in the marketing industry for students from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. {info found here}

 

My backgroud and passion for creating better opportunities for inner-city high school students

As an alumni of an inner-city school (Arlington High School class of 2005), I was immediately drawn to this program when I read about it. In my experience, inner-city high schools tend to focus on graduating kids from high school and nothing beyond. There are usually additional programs that college-driven students need to get involved in to find the support they don’t get at home. For example, I come from a single-parent home and my single-parent is not college educated. The likelyhood of me even attending college was low, coupled with the fact that I was from the inner-city and attended a public school. I felt as though I had to jump through hoops and hurdles just to even THINK about college. Luckily, I was involved with Admission Possible, which is amazing program, and I was able to go start my college career off at St. Kate’s. But, I digress… back to the topic at hand!

By engaging these students, not only are we opening students up to the local advertising community but we are showing them first hand what it takes to create everything from start to finish of an ad campaign. These are things I did not learn until recently when I’ve taken college-level courses. These students have such a great advantage at their fingertips. They learn about The Media Mix, Ethics in Marketing and Advertising, Brands and Branding and Print/Radio/TV Spot Production, to name a few things. With experienced professionals at their side, the students will be able to dig deep into these topics and learn hands-on about marketing and advertising.

I am excited to say that I will be volunteering with The Brand Lab for this spring semester! I stepped up to the plate and emailed to see how I can get involved. I absolutely love marketing and advertising and am an advocate for young adults that need support and a mentor.

I will be sure to keep an update on the blog of this spring’s adventure with The Brand Lab.

Stay warm!

Leah

 

Who has time to slim slowly?

Don’t you wish you could take a pill or sip a drink instead of a meal and you could lose weight?

I saw this commercial last night and I was quite appalled.

The tagline, “who has time to slim slowly?”.

Weight is something I’ve always “battled” with. Up until the age of 18/19, I was able to eat whatever I wanted, never work out or exercise. Needless to say, from age 18 until now for me it’s been a constant weight gain. I made the decision recently that it had to stop. I had never tried any fad diets. I never once drank a slim fast drink instead of a meal. I like food. I like to eat. I like to cook.

I am not a nutritionist, in fact my only background in nutrition is an online course I took when I was 19 years old for a general education credit and being in Weight Watchers twice. The one thing I learned from that class and Weight Watchers was that if you want to lose weight, you need to do it slowly. If you lose 10 pounds in two weeks magically, something isn’t right.

Body image is a huge issue for most women my age. With eating disorders being a silent killer, I am disheartened to see that Slim Fast is promoting losing weight fast. Wouldn’t it be just as easy to become bulimic  or anorexic? To me, promoting “3 snacks, 2 shakes or meal bars and 1 balanced meal” is not healthy.

I honestly believe that the easiest way to lose weight is simple:

Eat GOOD food and move more.

Since mid-November (coming up on 7 weeks) I am down 10 pounds. What did I do? Honestly? I joined the gym. I did 45 minutes of cardio 3x a week. I tried to eat before 8pm. I ate oatmeal for breakfast. Replaced a calorie-loaded vanilla white chocolate mocha from Caribou with a cold press iced coffee.

When you start moving more, your body craves better food, at least in my experience. I never really ate BAD, just… too much. I don’t allow myself to become upset if I really want some cake from Cafe Latte. In fact, I will go get the cake. But I’ll save half for the next day or split it with my roommate.

vodka + red bull = delish

OH, and liquor. Surprisingly (or not so surprisingly) consuming (cough) 5+ drinks per week in one night on the town doesn’t promote weight loss.

This ad campaign may help Slim Fast reach their goals: sales of the product. But I do not feel it is promoting a healthy way to lose weight. And if that is their ultimate goal, don’t you think that they should promote losing weight the healthy way? Does this boil down to ethics in marketing?

**I did check out the website for “the new Slim Fast” and in very fine print in the bottom they state that it is not healthy to lose more than 2lbs per week (which is what I’ve always been told). I am glad that is posted but at the same time I was seeking that out.

Coke Zero and Diet Coke

We have spent some time in class discussing Coke Zero and how the product is essentially the same thing as Diet Coke – zero calorie cola. The difference is the marketing plan (and the sweetener that is used). Do they taste different? To be honest, I have never had Coke Zero. I’m a Diet Coke girl and if Coke Zero tastes just like regular Coke count me out because I don’t really like regular Coke.

One of my co-workers is an avid Coke Zero drinker. When I decided I would write about Coke Zero’s marketing versus Diet Coke’s marketing, I asked her out of purely out of curiousity why she doesn’t drink Diet Coke. She said that she doesn’t like the taste. She loves regular Coke but doesn’t want the calories. When Coke Zero was created 5 years ago she started drinking that. I then informed her about the differences between the two and how their marketing differs. She said she had never even thought of that or paid attention to the ads for Coke Zero. She said after thinking about it, it does make sense. But for her she makes her decisions strictly on taste, not on calories or advertising.

Let’s take a look at a 2010 Coke Zero ad:

And now a Diet Coke ad from 2009:

While researching ads for this blog post I came across www.dietcoke.com and Diet Coke’s YouTube Channel. On there I found this ad, apparently it’s a new ad for 2010….

The difference between their 2009 ad and 2010 ad is apparent: they’re trying to shy away from Diet Coke being just a “woman’s” drink and incorporate gender equality into their campaign. I actually really like the last ad. I think it does present Diet Coke as a drink that is “OK” for anyone to drink. But at the end of the day, if you like Diet Coke you should drink it because you like it, not because it is tagged as a woman’s drink because it has “diet” in the name.

I came across this article from Antony Young and AdAge. The article compares, contrasts and rates Coke Zero and Pepsi Max’s media strageties. This plays in with what have been talking about in class and for our IMC plans for our brand or company. [FYI: Pepsi Max is their zero calorie verison of Pepsi]

In the case of Coke Zero and Pepsi Max, these beverage giants are chasing a burgeoning market of men who apparently aren’t man enough to own up to drinking a soda marked “diet.” -Antony Young

According to the article, Coke Zero adapted a brand media strategy based on four key pillars: sports, social media, schools and Spanish language. They do a lot of advertising in college basketball, football and Nascar. Coke in general has an entire online social media principles on their website available for anyone to see.

The bottom line is the Coke Zero and Diet Coke are two products that are quite similar but marketed to different markets. Coca-Cola uses different marketing strategies for each brand. Although it’s a new brand, Coke Zero has proven to be successful. According to their website it was one of their most successful product launches in their history. On the other hand, Diet Coke is the number 3 soft drink in the world.

Interactive Media

The internet seems like the most prevalent place for interactive media – such as “click on me” ads or being able to literally interact with the ad being presented to you. 

On a daily basis, I will be bombarded by many different ads, presented to me in many different ways. On YouTube, I have to exit out of an ad to continue to watch the video. When I’m watching Grey’s Anatomy on-line, I have to watch 30 seconds of ads and these are quite interactive – the video I am watching becomes smaller and the ad takes over the screen. I can quite literally interact with the ad. I can select and click and before I know it, the 30 seconds is over and I’ve just spent two minutes doing exactly what “they” want me to do – which is spend time with their ad.

As far as what works me, if I am interested in something, then I am going to seek it out. If I am bombarded by an ad for shaving gel or men’s products (something I have no use for), then I am not going to go out of my way to spend time with their ad. I am persuaded by creativity – by something out of the box, something unique and different than what everyone else is offering.

Twitter Top Trends

In today’s new social media empowered world, Twitter is a marketing and advertising powerhouse. Marketers can use Twitter to get the word out about their blogs, new products, happenings in the company and many more things. One of my favorite advertising “tweeps” is @AdAge. Ad Age, obviously, is Advertising Age, which is a publication for marketing and advertising news. They have the online component as well as a print version.

Browing the internet today I found this:

 

I stumbled across TweetStats and was quite surprised to see Justin Bieber as a top trend. OK, I wasn’t surprised but really to me it goes to show that The Biebs and his tween-following trumps… well, everything. He’s right up there with iPhone, AT&T and Christmas.

A smart marketer could use Twitter and follow the trends to create different advertising campaigns depending on the market and goals of the campaign.

As a student and young professional, being well-versed in Twitter and it’s many components could be ideal for a future job. You never know if a job you’re applying for will want you to be familiar with social media. The way I see it, in the next 5 – 10 years it’ll be a great thing to have on your side.

By the way, in the time it’s taken me to write this post (about 15 minutes), the tweetstats have updated! How interesting!

@LeahZins

Pandora

Last night in class, we got on the topic of radio, internet radio and ads. I was listening to Pandora, as I do most days while working, and this came up. Thought I’d share with you.

And also note the side bar ad! Our favorite, Target!